Two New-to-Us Halloween Books

Halloween always seems to slip up on me, book-wise, and I end up reading all of our favorites in marathon fashion on October 30th and 31st. This year, I’m making a real effort to work these in a little bit sooner, so we can stretch out the fun over a few weeks. I’ve shared several of our family’s classic Halloween selections before, so today I wanted to share two new choices.

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This brand-new book reminds me, illustration-wise, of Ghosts in the House (IndieBound/Amazon), which I reviewed last year. It’s Only a Witch Can Fly (IndieBound/Amazon), by Alison McGhee with spellbinding illustrations by Taeeun Yoo. The book’s plot is fairly basic: a little girl sees a bright moon shining in the sky, and longs to be a witch so that she can fly to see it. Her early attempts result in failure, but eventually she manages to “be” a witch and fly to the moon.

When I first read this story to the girls, the rhyme scheme had me stumped. It was irregular, and I couldn’t figure out why some words rhymed and others just repeated. Then, I read the dedication page and learned that the text was written in the form of a sestina, a style of poetry that has its roots in the music of French troubadours. Obviously, this is highly unusual in a children’s book, but it definitely works for this story, because it evokes something ancient that helps the reader understand the little girl’s very basic and primal desire to fly.

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Another aspect of this book that I particularly enjoyed was the involvement of the little girl’s family. When the little girl’s attempt to fly results in her being flung from her broom, it is her younger brother that picks up the broom and encourages her to try again. After she soars across the moon in the night, her entire family runs to greet her and celebrate what she has done. While obviously not the sort of thing that happens in daily life, the love and support shown to the girl is downright heartwarming – not at all what you’d expect to see in a book where the main character wants to be a witch!

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Some of you are shocked to see this here, because you know I’m not normally a fan of books that turn into interminable series, and Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin’s Click, Clack, Moo! (IndieBound/Amazon) seems to have done just that. However, the latest entry into the saga of a farmyard full of recalcitrant animals (and one pesky duck) is actually pretty fun reading. Click, Clack, Boo! (IndieBound/Amazon) takes us back to the farm on Halloween night, where we learn that Farmer Brown is not a fan of the holiday. In fact, he hides under his covers, hoping to skip the entire thing.

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Not surprisingly, the animals in the barn plan a huge party to celebrate, and their costumes are hysterical, which is to be expected. Also as to be expected, Farmer Brown finds a note from Duck, who is dressed as a vampire. Unexpectedly, though, the note actually invites Farmer Brown to join the animals in the barn, where he receives a surprise that is not at all spooky.

For those of you who have kiddos who get scared easily, this is a good book to read to discuss how things that seems spooky often aren’t frightening at all. Even though Duck’s behavior initially frightens Farmer Brown, we, as readers, know that it is just Duck, who is much more silly than scary. Bethany, who is afraid of anything in costume, found it reassuring to know that the animals in costumes were the characters she was used to seeing in Click, Clack, Moo.

Have you added any great new Halloween books to your libraries? We’re also looking for suggestions, so feel free to share if you have.

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