Angelo: An Unsung David Macaulay Classic

architecture books, books about loss and grief for children, children's grief books

Today, I want to share a little about this fantastic book that appeared on our library’s shelves a few weeks ago. Initially, I picked it up because of the author/illustrator. Like many people, I’ve long loved David Macalay’s magnificent architecture/engineering non-fiction works, including Castle (IndieBound/Amazon) and Mosque (IndieBound/Amazon). These large-format masterpieces have stayed in print for decades, and encouraged more than a few reluctant readers to read those pesky words sitting beside the intricate illustrations.

Angelo, by David Macaulay

Like Macaulay’s other work, Angelo (IndieBound/Amazon) is illustrated in almost a technical style, as you can see in the inset above. Unlike those other books, though, there is a definite human touch in the illustrations and story that makes this book really memorable. The story is straightforward: Angelo is a plasterer, working to restore a church in Florence. He befriends an injured pigeon, who becomes his constant companion. As Angelo ages and his health fades, the pigeon (now named Sylvia) provides as much help and comfort as she can. Angelo’s final masterwork is a permanent home for Sylvia, and Angelo passes away knowing that Sylvia will always have a safe place to rest.

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I was genuinely surprised to reach the end of the story and feel so strongly about the way that Angelo and Sylvia had helped each other. The discussion of death is done so deftly that young children might not even realize exactly what has happened to Angelo. My three year old loves this story, and explains matter-of-factly that Angelo has died at the end, but focuses more on the final nest he created for Sylvia. My very sensitive four year old also enjoys rereading this book, and will take the time to carefully study the illustrations, looking for little secrets in the pictures.

While this may not be The Book to use if your child or student is facing a particularly difficult loss, I think it is amazing as a simple introduction to the concept that all living things will eventually die. There are no meaningless platitudes, and no particular religious references, other than the funeral scene taking place at the church that Angelo re-plastered. There is a calmness to the story, which comes from the reader knowing that Angelo led a beautiful life and that he and Sylvia would live on in each others’ hearts.

Basically, it’s just plain lovely.

 

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